Resizing System Protection (System Restore) Storage in Windows Vista

Windows Vista does not have an user interface to resize the System Protection (System Restore) storage like Windows XP did. Windows Vista has a command line utility that can accomplish the resizing and moving of the System Protection storage. Resizing or moving the System Protection storage will also affect how many Previous Versions of a document or picture you have stored on your computer.

Resize System Protection (System Restore) in Windows Vista

  1. Open an Elevated Command Prompt windows, refer to "Opening an Elevated Command Prompt" if you need help.
  2. Determine what is the maximum size of System Protection. Type the following in the Elevated Command Prompt window.

    vssadmin List ShadowStorage

    You should see how much storage space System Protection is using, what the allocated space for System Protection, and what the maximum size for System Protection.

  3. Type the following in the Elevated Command Prompt window to resize the maximum size for System Protection.

    vssadmin Resize ShadowStorage /For=C: /On=C: /MaxSize=1GB

    NOTES

    System Protection maximum size cannot be below 300MB. You can have the following suffixes for MaxSize, KB, MB, GB, TB, PB, and EB. If a suffix is not supplied then Windows Vista will use bytes as the suffix.

    More Examples

    If you want the System Protection to be resized to 400MB for Drive C but you want the System Protection storage for Drive C to be located on Drive D then you would type:

    vssadmin Resize ShadowStorage /For=C: /On=D: /MaxSize=400MB

    If you want the System Protection to be resized to 1.5GB for Drive D and have System Protection for Drive D located on Drive D then you would type:

    vssadmin Resize ShadowStorage /For=D: /On=D: /MaxSize=1.5GB

    or

    vssadmin Resize ShadowStorage /For=D: /On=D: /MaxSize=1500MB

WARNING

Resizing or moving System Protection storage may result in loss of shadow copies and system restore point. I would recommend only to resize or move System Protection storage when your computer is operating without difficulties.

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Version 1.3
Edited: May 3, 2012

How to Turn On System Protection (System Restore) in Windows Vista

Windows Vista System Protection can be turned on or turned off. Turning off Windows Vista System Protection will remove all restore points, turn off system protection monitoring, and remove any previous versions of documents and pictures. I would highly recommend for all users of Windows Vista to have System Protection turned on for maximum system protection.

How to Turn On System Protection (System Restore) in Windows Vista

NOTE

To enlarge the images, simply click on the images you would like to view. With Internet Explorer 7, you can right-click on the image to select Open in New Tab.

  1. Click on the Start Orb (commonly known as the Start button).
  2. Type System in the Start Search field on the Start Menu. Refer to Step 1 on the Image below.
  3. The Programs in the Start Menu in the left pane will populate. "System" should appear. Click on System to launch the System window page. Refer to Step 2 on the Image below.

     

  4. When the System windows appears then click System Protection. Refer to Image below.

     

  5. A UAC Prompt should appear to allow access to the elevated System Protection. Click on Continue to allow the elevated System Protection window to open. Refer to the Image below.

     

  6. The System Protection window will open allowing you to turn on System Protection by checking the box that represents the hard drive System Protection is to monitor. Click Apply to accept the changes. Refer to Image below.

  7. You may want to create a System Restore point now, refer to "Create a System Restore Point".

NOTE

To enlarge the images, simply click on the images you would like to view. With Internet Explorer 7, you can right-click on the image to select Open in New Tab.

Related Articles

Version 1.2
Edited: May 3, 2012

How to Turn Off System Protection (System Restore) in Windows Vista

Windows Vista System Protection can be turned on or turned off. Turning off Windows Vista System Protection will remove all restore points, turn off system restore monitoring, and remove all Previous Version of documents and pictures on your computer. I would highly recommend for all users of Windows Vista to have System Protection turned on for maximum system protection.

How to Turn Off System Protection (System Restore) in Windows Vista

NOTE

To enlarge the images, simply click on the images you would like to view. With Internet Explorer 7, you can right-click on the image to select Open in New Tab.

  1. Click on the Start Orb (commonly known as the Start button).
  2. Type System in the Start Search field on the Start Menu. Refer to Step 1 on the Image below.
  3. The Programs in the Start Menu in the left pane will populate. "System" should appear. Click on System to launch the System window page. Refer to Step 2 on the Image below.

     

  4. When the System windows appears then click System Protection. Refer to Image below.

     

  5. A UAC Prompt should appear to allow access to the elevated System Protection. Click on Continue to allow the elevated System Protection window to open. Refer to the Image below.

     

  6. The System Protection window will open allowing you to turn off System Protection by un-checking the box that represents the hard drive System Protection is monitoring. Refer to Image below.

     

  7. Click Turn System Restore Off to turn off Windows Vista System Protection monitoring. Refer to Image below.

     

  8. Click the Apply button to turn off Windows Vista System Protection and remove all System Restore points. Refer to Image below.

NOTE: To enlarge the images, simply click on the images you would like to view. With Internet Explorer 7, you can right-click on the image to select Open in New Tab.

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Version 1.2
Edited: May 3, 2012

Restore your Computer using the Windows Vista Bootable DVD to use System Restore

Windows Vista DVD has System Recovery Options when you boot from the Windows Vista DVD. System Restore is included in the Windows Vista System Recovery Options. Windows Vista System Restore can be a very useful tool when your computer is not starting correctly and you need to restore your computer using a System Restore point. To learn how to create a System Restore point, read "Create a System Restore Point". For restoring your computer with a system restore point within Windows Vista, read "Restore Your System/Computer Using A User Created System Restore Point".

Restoring Your Computer Using the Windows Vista Bootable DVD to use System Restore

NOTE

To enlarge the images, simply click on the images you would like to view. With Internet Explorer 7, you can right-click on the image to select Open in New Tab.

  1. Insert the Windows Vista DVD into DVD drive.
  2. Boot the computer using the Windows Vista DVD.
  3. Press any key on your keyboard when you see Press any key to boot from CD or DVD…. Refer to Image below.

     

  4. Select your Regional settings then click Next. Refer to Image below.

     

  5. On the Install Now screen, click Repair your computer to access the System Recovery Options from the Windows Vista DVD. Refer to Image below.

     

  6. Choose the Operating System you wish to restore your computer using Windows Vista System Restore. You may need to load drivers for your hard disk if the OS is not detected and presented in the list of operating systems. Once an OS is selected then click Next to continue to the Windows Vista System Recovery Options on the Windows Vista DVD. Refer to Image below.

     

  7. Click System Restore to launch the Windows Vista System Restore utility. Refer to Image below.

     

  8. Click Next to choose the restore point to restore your computer to a time when your computer was working correctly. Refer to Image below.

     

  9. Select a Restore Point from the restore point list then click Next to continue with System Restore. Refer to Image below.

     

  10. Select and confirm the disks you want System Restore to restore your computer with the chosen system restore point then click Next to continue. Refer to Image below.
     

  11. Click Finish to start the System Restore process. Refer to Image below.
     

  12. Click Yes to confirm and start the System Restore process. Refer to Image below.
     

  13. Click Restart to complete the System Restore process. Remove any CD or DVD in your CD/DVD drive to start Windows Vista normally. Refer to Image below.
     

  14. If System Restore was successful in restoring your computer to a previous state then you should see the following window when you log into Windows Vista after performing a System Restore with the Windows Vista Bootable DVD. Refer to Image below.
     

NOTE

To enlarge the images, simply click on the images you would like to view. With Internet Explorer 7, you can right-click on the image to select Open in New Tab.

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Version 1.2
Edited: May 3, 2012

Restore Your System/Computer Using A User Created System Restore Point

Restoring your computer using the System Restore Point made by you is made simple with Windows Vista. If you would like to learn how to create a System Restore point in Windows Vista then please read "Create a System Restore Point". You may need to restore your computer using Windows Vista System Reatore because an install of software or drivers didn’t go as planned, you made some registry edits and the registry edits are causing you problems. There could be numerous reasons as to why you would want to restore your computer using Windows Vista System Restore. You can use Windows Vista System Restore from the Windows Vista Bootable DVD to recover from startup problems that are stopping Windows Vista from starting, more details "Restore your Computer using the Windows Vista Bootable DVD to use System Restore".

Restoring Your Computer Using The System Restore Point You Created

NOTE

To enlarge the images, simply click on the images you would like to view. With Internet Explorer 7, you can right-click on the image to select Open in New Tab.

  1. Click on the Start Orb (commonly known as the Start button).
  2. Type System Restore in the Start Search field on the Start Menu. Refer to Step 1 on the Image below.
  3. The Programs in the Start Menu in the left pane will populate. "System Restore" should appear. Click on System to launch the System Restore utility. Refer to Step 2 on the Image below.
     

  4. A UAC Prompt should appear to allow access to the elevated System Restore utility. Click on Continue to allow the elevated System Restore utility to open. Refer to the Image below.

  5. When the System Restore utility opens, then choose Choose a different restore point. Click Next to continue. Refer to Image below.
     

  6. Now click on the System Restore point that you created. All System Restore points created by users will be shown in the Description field as Manual: and then the name you gave the System Restore Point you have created. Click Next to continue. Refer to Image below.
     

  7. Click Next to confirm the System Restore Point you wish to use to restore your Computer prior to the System Restore point. Refer to Image below.
     

  8. Another confirmation window will appear to make sure you want to restore your computer to the time you created the System Restore Point. Click Next to continue. Your computer will automatically reboot after you have clicked Next. Refer to Image below.
     

  9. If you see the following Image below then you have successfully restored your system/computer with the System Restore you created using the System Restore utility.
     

NOTE

To enlarge the images, simply click on the images you would like to view. With Internet Explorer 7, you can right-click on the image to select Open in New Tab.

Related Articles

Version 1.4
Edited: May 2, 2012

Create a System Restore Point

I like creating System Restore Points prior to making changes to the Windows Vista registry. So, if I mess up then I can simply go to the System Restore Point and restore the Windows Vista registry. There may be other reasons such as installing software and driver for making System Restore points prior to the installs.

Create a System Restore Point

NOTE

To enlarge the images, simply click on the images you would like to view. With Internet Explorer 7, you can right-click on the image to select Open in New Tab.

  1. Click on the Start Orb (commonly known as the Start button).
  2. Type System in the Start Search field on the Start Menu. Refer to Step 1 on the Image below.
  3. The Programs in the Start Menu in the left pane will populate. "System" should appear. Click on System to launch the System window page. Refer to Step 2 on the Image below.
     

  4. When the System windows appears then click System Protection. Refer to Image below.
     

  5. A UAC Prompt should appear to allow access to the elevated System Protection. Click on Continue to allow the elevated System Protection window to open. Refer to the Image below.
     

  6. The System Protection window will open allowing you to create a System Restore point by clicking on Create. Refer to Image below.
     

  7. Enter a name for the System Restore point in the text box field and then click Create. Refer to Image below.
     

  8. If you see the following Image below then you have successfully created a System Restore point using System Protection.
     

NOTE

To enlarge the images, simply click on the images you would like to view. With Internet Explorer 7, you can right-click on the image to select Open in New Tab.

If you need to restore the computer using the System Restore point that we just created then follow my blog article called "Restore Your System/Computer Using A User Created System Restore Point". If you are having problems starting Windows Vista then you can use Windows Vista System Restore from the Windows Vista Bootable DVD to recover from startup problems, more details "Restore your Computer using the Windows Vista Bootable DVD to use System Restore".

Related Articles

Version 1.4
Edited: May 2, 2012